Food Insecure Children Are More Likely To Be Obese

It’s a contradiction in the starkest terms. The nation’s most food-insecure children are also at the greatest risk for childhood obesity, according to a study published in the Journal of the American Osteopathic Association in September.

The study surveyed more than 7,000 adolescents between the ages of 12 and 18, finding that participants from the most food insecure households — defined in the study as having “marginally low,” “low,” and “very low” food security — were 33 to 44 percent more likely to be overweight and 1.5 times more likely to be obese.

Obesity is linked to a host of health problems, including a higher risk for cardiovascular disease, pre-diabetes, bone and joint problems, as well as psychological problems such as stigmatization and low self-esteem, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

The United States Department of Agriculture defines food security as “access by all people at all times to enough food for an active, healthy life.” People who do not have access to enough food for a healthy, active life are considered food insecure. Fourteen percent of U.S. households qualify as food insecure at some point during the year, a number that rises to almost 20 percent among households with children, according a 2013 USDA report.

Read more: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/food-insecurity-linked-to-child-obesity_55eefd6be4b03784e276821b

Find the report here: http://jaoa.org/article.aspx?articleid=2432876